Passive Cooling–An Efficient Way to Cool your Home

 

Passive Cooling:

 

With the number of 100 degree plus days in Texas, passive cooling can be considered to more easily get the indoor temperature inside the comfort range.  Passive cooling can be described as the use of the sun’s energy for the heating and cooling of living spaces.   The building takes advantage of natural energy characteristics in materials and air created by exposure to the sun. Passive systems are simple, have few moving parts, and need minimal maintenance and free of mechanical systems.  A few critical decisions during the design process could allow a building to be naturally cooled with less burden and to the cooling systems in a building.

Passive Cooling Guidelines:

  • The building should be elongated on an east-west axis.
  • The building’s south face should receive sunlight between the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 3:00 P.M. (sun time) during the heating season.
  • Interior spaces requiring the most light and heating and cooling should be along the south face of the building. Less used spaces should be located on the north.
  • An open floor plan optimizes passive system operation.
  • Use shading to prevent summer sun entering the interior.

Cross Ventilation:

Making a building permeable is the easiest way to encourage cross ventilation.   The building has to have several places where air can enter and exit a building.   For the most effective ventilation, there should be openings on the prevailing wind (windward) side of the building and, likewise, the opposite (leeward) side of the building.  This arrangement will allow the air to be pulled through the building.

Chimney or Stack Ventilation:

Another form of ventilation is through stack ventilation. In this method, the same principles of cross-ventilation apply, except a height factor is included. Since hot air rises, creating a high exit on an upper floor of a multi-story space will be more efficient at exhausting the rising heat. The hot air at the top and cool air at the bottom create a natural convection of air flow, which will also aide in the movement of air through the building. An exhaust fan can also be used if more air flow is desired.

Shading:

The photo (above) is a remodel by Masters Touch Custom Homes, this photo illustrates how both exterior decking and vegetation help to prevent direct sunlight from entering the windows.

Shading devices over windows and doors prevent direct sunlight from entering the home.  Awnings, shutters and blinds will help to minimize a building from over heating.  Quality windows and doors will also prevent the compromise of the exterior envelope of a building.  Trees and other greenery strategically placed can be beneficial in preventing direct sunlight from entering the building.

Thank you for reading.  Visit our website at www.masterstch.com

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